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Posts for category: Foot Condition

By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
March 27, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bunion  

A bunion is a bony lump on the side of the big toe. With a bunion, the big toe leans toward the other toes, rather than pointing straight  Bunionahead. Some individuals unnecessarily suffer the pain of bunions for years before seeking treatment. Led by Dr. Gary Rogers, Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic (located in the North Shore area) offers treatments for bunions. Read on to learn more about them!

1. Padding and taping. Bunion treatment often starts with padding and taping the bunion. Your podiatrist can help you pad and tape your foot in a normal position. This helps to realign the joint and take pressure off the bunion. Padding and taping will relieve your discomfort and keep your bunion from getting worse.

2. Medication. To treat your bunion, your podiatrist may recommend a prescription medication or OTC pain medicine such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or naproxen. Your podiatrist may also recommend medicine to relieve swelling. Also, always remember to be safe with these medications and to follow the instructions on the medicine label carefully.

3. Injection therapy. If your pain persists, your healthcare provider may inject cortisone into the tissue to reduce pain and swelling. The cortisone injections include a corticosteroid medication and local anesthetic. Cortisone is a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory hormone that is present in the body at all times.

4. Custom Orthotics- Custom foot orthotics (i.e. shoe inserts) can be very helpful in treating bunions. They can help take pressure off the deformity and relieve your pain.

5. Bunion Surgery. In general, if your bunion isn't painful, you don't need surgery. If the pain interferes with your daily activities, however, it's time to discuss surgical options with your doctor. At a consultation at our North Shore office, we can decide together if surgical treatment is right for you.

Get rid of that bunion and get relief! Call Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic at 847-256-4434 right now to schedule an appointment in the North Shore area.

By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
February 07, 2019
Category: Foot Condition

Heel pain is one of the most common complaints a podiatrist hears about from patients. If you are dealing with heel pain above the heel bone then you could be dealing with Achilles Tendonitis, a result of overuse. The Achilles tendon is the longest tendon in the body and it serves to connect the muscles of the calf with the lower leg and heel bone.

While Achilles Tendonitis tends to occur most often in runners, this condition can still occur in athletes that play certain sports such as soccer or tennis. Unfortunately, this tendon does weaken as we get older, which makes at an increased risk for developing this overuse injury as we age.

 

What are the symptoms of Achilles Tendonitis?

The most obvious symptom of Achilles Tendonitis is pain above the heel bone. When the pain first appears it’s usually pretty mild and you may only notice it after running; however, over time you may notice that the pain gets worse after certain exercises. Along with pain you may also experience stiffness or tenderness in the heel, especially in the morning or after long periods of sitting.

 

When should I see a podiatrist?

If this is the first time that you’ve ever experienced heel pain then it’s a good idea to turn to a foot doctor who can determine whether Achilles Tendonitis is causing your symptoms or whether it’s something else. If you’re experiencing chronic heel pain around the Achilles tendon it’s also a good time to see a doctor. If the pain is severe or you are unable to put weight on your foot it’s possible that you might be dealing with a ruptured tendon, which requires immediate attention.

 

How do you treat Achilles Tendonitis?

In most cases, Achilles Tendonitis can be treated with simple self-care options. Unless symptoms are severe you may be able to treat your heel pain by:

  • Taking over-the-counter pain medications
  • Avoiding high-impact activities or activities that exacerbate symptoms
  • Elevating the foot to reduce swelling
  • Performing stretching exercises or undergoing physical therapy
  • Icing the heel
  • Wearing custom orthotics
  • Replacing worn-out shoes, especially running shoes

Surgery is only necessary if your symptoms aren’t responding to any other nonsurgical treatment options after several months or if the tendon is torn.

 

If you think your heel pain could be the result of Achilles Tendonitis then it’s time to turn to a podiatrist as soon as possible. A podiatrist can provide you with a variety of treatment options, from simple lifestyle modifications to custom orthotics.

By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
January 17, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Foot Pain  

Need help with your pain from your Wilmette, IL, podiatrist?

The pain you feel may be caused by the inflammation of a connective tissue known as plantar fasciitis. This connective tissue isn't just in your heel though, it extends past the arch of your foot, reaching your toes. Your North Shore foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Gary Rogers, has the expertise to provide you and others with the necessary information to cope and treat pain. Read below to learn more and contact your Wilmette foot and ankle specialist for treatment!

More about Pain

Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain, sometimes being referred to as heel spur syndrome when there is an accompanying spur. Other causes of heel pain include stress fractures, tendonitis, arthritis, and/or nerve irritation.

In many cases, pain manifests itself in different parts of the foot and worsens over the course of a few months. The causes of pain vary from one person to another.

Causes of foot paint include wearing poorly fitted or worn down footwear, problems with foot arches (flat or high-arched feet), injuries, such as bruises, incurred during both light and intense activities such as walking, running, excessive jumping, or jumping on hard surfaces, and being overweight.

Treatment Methods

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications
  • Wearing shoe modifications
  • Undergoing Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy
  • Performing stretching exercises
  • Avoiding going barefoot
  • Limiting activities

If you still have pain, see your podiatrist, who may take one of the following approaches:

  • Padding and strapping: Pads that soften the impact of walking when inserted in the shoe.
  • Injection therapy: Corticosteroid injections that help reduce the inflammation and relieve pain.
  • Night splint: A night splint that helps extend and stretch the plantar fascia while sleeping.
  • Physical therapy: Exercises that help provide relief.
  • Orthotic devices: Custom devices that correct structural abnormalities.

Consultation

If you have any questions or concerns, please consult your North Shore foot and ankle specialist in Wilmette, IL, today!

By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Sesamoid   Sesamoiditis  

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoids are small bones that are only connected to tendons or surrounded in muscle. This only appears in a few places in the body, one of which is the foot. Two very tiny sesamoids are found in the underside of the foot near the big toe. One is on the outer side of the foot and the other bone is close to the middle of the foot. This structure provides a smooth surface for the tendons to slide over, which helps the tendons move muscles. They help with weight bearing and also help to elevate the bones of the big toe. So now that you know what sesamoids are, you might be wondering what sesamoiditis is and what its symptoms are.

Sesamoiditis

Just like any other bone, sesamoids can unfortunately fracture. The tendons surrounding the sesamoids may also become irritated or inflamed and this is what sesamoiditis is. Sesamoiditis is also a form of tendonitis and is a common condition among ballerinas, runners, and baseball catchers due to the pressure that is constantly placed on their feet.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis may include:

  • Pain under the big toe or ball of the foot
  • Swelling and/or bruising
  • Difficulty in bending and straightening the big toe

Treating Sesamoiditis

Treatments include:

  • Resting and stopping any activity that could be causing pain and inflammation
  • Anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen and aspirin only after consulting your physician
  • Icing the sole of the foot
  • Wearing soft-soled and low-heeled shoes
  • Cushioning inserts in the shoes

If symptoms persist after treatments, you may need to wear a removable brace for 4-6 weeks to help the bones heal. Call your podiatrist today to ask any questions about sesamoiditis and get on your way to pain-free feet once again!

By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
October 22, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!