Treating Your Heel Pain
By Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic
November 14, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Heel Pain  

Your feet go through a lot of natural wear-and-tear on a daily basis, sometimes resulting in debilitating pain, especially when it comes to Heel-Painthe heels. Fortunately, here at Wilmette Foot and Ankle Clinic, your podiatrist, Dr. Gary Rogers, understands the importance of having healthy heels, and he is proud to provide his services to those in the North Shore area.

If you'd like to learn more about the different heel pain conditions and how to treat them, here is some information:

 

What types of conditions cause heel pain?

  1. Haglund's Deformity is a painful growth on the back of the heel bone. Women tend to develop these red, painful, swollen deformities on the heel bone because of poorly fitted shoes.
  2. Heel calluses, i.e. plantar calluses, develop when a metatarsal bone is too long or not appropriately aligned with others and ends up hitting the ground with too much force. Consequently, the skin underneath the bone thickens, resulting in calluses that can become quite irritated and result in pain.
  3. Heel fissures occur when the skin at the heel cracks and thickens, resulting in recurrent bleeding. Inappropriate shoes, such as open-backed sandals, and skin conditions, like eczema and psoriasis, may lead to heel fissures.
  4. Plantar fasciitis, also known as a heel spur syndrome, is an inflammation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot (i.e. the plantar fascia). The connective tissue stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the heel bone.

 

How can you treat heel pain?

  • Haglund's Deformity can be treated by reducing the friction and foot irritation produced from wearing ill-fitting shoes. Accordingly, wear shoes that are comfortable, not too tight or too loose, and avoid high heels. Soaking your feet in warm soapy water and using anti-inflammatory medications can mitigate symptoms, as well, but make sure that you speak with your podiatrist before taking any medication.
  • Heel calluses don't necessarily need surgical treatment, but when they do, your North Shore area podiatrist performs a procedure called an osteotomy. This treatment relieves pressure off the metatarsal bone by properly aligning it with the other bones, thus alleviating pressure and preventing heel callus formation.
  • Heel fissures are treated by wearing proper shoes. Deep skin moisturizers and lotions may also reduce dryness and give your heel time to heal.
  • Plantar fasciitis is successfully treated with non-surgical methods, such as anti-inflammatory medications, ice packs, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and physical therapy. If the condition is persistent, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment (ESWT) may be used to treat heel pain.

 

Need relief? Call our North Shore office today!

For more information about heel pain, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Gary Rogers' office today by dialing (847) 256-4434!

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